Engine, meeting emissions regulations
All engines – diesel, gasoline, propane, and natural gas – produce exhaust gases containing carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and oxides of nitrogen. These emissions are the result of incomplete combustion. Diesel engines also produce particulate matter (PM). As more focus is placed on health and environmental issues, governmental agencies throughout the world are enacting more stringent emissions laws.
 
Because so many diesel engines are used in trucks, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and their counterparts in Europe and Japan first focused on enacting emissions regulations for the on-highway market. While the worldwide regulations for off-highway diesel equipment were not passed until a later date, the rate of increasing regulation standards has been more aggressive than on-highway regulations.
 
The first standards for new off-highway diesel engines over 37 kW (50 hp) were phased in from 1996 to 1999 (EPA Tier 1). European Union (EU) standards for non-road engines (EU Stage I) began in 1999. All authorities set more stringent Tier 2/Stage II and Tier 3/Stage IIIA standards for all equipment with phase-in schedules from 2001 to 2008. Interim Tier 4/Stage IIIB regulations took effect in 2008 for engines 56 kW (75 hp) and below and will be completed by 2011 for higher-horsepower engines.
 
The following chart contains detailed implementation dates and emissions levels for the EPA and EU regulations.
EPA non-road emissions regulations
 
kW Hp 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
0-7 0-10         7.5
0.8
    7.5
0.4
             
8-18 11-24         7.5
0.8
    7.5
0.4
             
19-36 25-49       7.5
0.6
      7.5
0.3
        4.7
0.03
   
37-56 50-74       7.5
0.4
      4.7
0.3
        4.7
0.03
   
4.7
0.3
      4.7
0.03
     
57-74 75-98       7.5
0.4
      4.7
0.4
      3.4
0.19
0.02
    0.4
0.19
0.02
75-129 100-174     6.6
0.3
      4.0
0.3
      3.4
0.19
0.02
    0.4
0.19
0.02
130-224 175-299     6.6
0.2
    4.0
0.2
        2.0
0.19
0.02
    0.4
0.19
0.02
 
225-449 300-599 6.4
0.2
       
450-559 600-749   6.4
0.2
     
≥560 ≥750           6.4
0.2
        3.5
0.19
0.1
      3.5
0.19
0.04
 
 
EU non-road emissions regulations
 
kW Hp 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
0-7 0-10 Not regulated in EU
8-18 11-24 Not regulated in EU
19-36 25-49 8.0
1.5
0.8
          7.5
0.8
               
37-56 50-74       7.0
1.3
0.4
      4.7
0.4
        4.7
0.025
   
57-74 75-98       7.0
1.3
0.4
      4.7
0.4
      3.3
0.19
0.025
    0.40
0.19
0.025
75-129 100-174     6.0
1.0
0.3
      4.0
0.3
        3.3
0.19
0.025
    0.40
0.19
0.025
130-559 175-749   6.0
1.0
0.2
      4.0
0.2
        2.0
0.19
0.025
    0.40
0.19
0.025
 
≥560 ≥750 Not regulated in EU
 
 
Fuel sulfur regulations
 
  2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
EPA 5000 ppm 500 ppm 15 ppm
EU 2000 ppm 1000 ppm 10 ppm
 
Legend
 
EPA Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3 Interim Tier 4 Final Tier 4
EU Stage I Stage II Stage III A Stage III B Stage IV
 
Examples
 

NOx
NMHC
PM
2.0
0.19
0.025
2.0, the maximum amount of nitrogen oxide (NOx) allowed in grams / kW-hr
0.19, the maximum amount of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) allowed in grams / kW-hr
0.025, the maximum amount of particulate matter (PM) allowed in grams / kW-hr
 
NMHC + NOx
PM
7.5
0.8
7.5, the maximum amount of NMHC + NOx allowed in grams / kW-hr
0.8, the maximum amount of PM allowed in grams / kW-hr
NOTE: High sulfur fuels should not be used in engines equipped with exhaust gas recirculation valves (EGR).
 
Reducing worldwide emissions
 
Tier 3/Stage IIIA standards required an approximate 65 percent reduction in PM and a 60 percent reduction in NOx from 1996 levels. Interim Tier 4/Stage IIIB standards require a ten-fold reduction in PM along with a two-fold drop in NOx. Final Tier 4/Stage IV standards, which will be fully implemented by 2015, will decrease NOx an additional five-fold.
 
The following chart illustrates the emission level reductions for the United States and Europe.
EPA/EU emissions regulations 37-560 kW, 50-750 hp

EPA/EU emissions regulations 37-560 kW, 50-750 hp

Preparing for future emissions reductions
 
The EPA and EU have both issued stringent emissions standards for future non-road diesel engines. John Deere recognizes the challenge of meeting the standards and will develop and apply appropriate technologies to address Tier 4/Stage IV emissions regulations.
 
The PowerTech™ family of engines has been the foundation for John Deere’s ongoing emissions solutions. John Deere continues to develop the technologies necessary to meet future emissions regulations, including additional in-cylinder and after treatment solutions, that will be applied to existing Tier 4/Stage IIIA engine platforms.
Emissions certifications
 
Emissions certificate Web site
 
2011 certificates for engine family BJDXL09.0202:
 
Last Updated : 25-Jul-2013